The total physical response approach to second language learning

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The total physical response approach to second language learning

Submitted 14 years 10 months ago by admin. This is an introduction to the teaching approach known as total physical response. How can I use it in class?

When should I use it? Why should I use it in the classroom?

The total physical response approach to second language learning

A few useful variations Are there any disadvantages with using TPR? Where is it from? It is based upon the way that children learn their mother tongue.

Parents have 'language-body conversations' with their children, the parent instructs and the child physically responds to this. The parent says, "Look at mummy" or "Give me the ball" and the child does so. These conversations continue for many months before the child actually starts to speak itself.

Even though it can't speak during this time, the child is taking in all of the language; the sounds and the patterns. Eventually when it has decoded enough, the child reproduces the language quite spontaneously.

TPR attempts to mirror this effect in the language classroom. In the classroom the teacher plays the role of parent. She starts by saying a word 'jump' or a phrase 'look at the board' and demonstrating an action.

The teacher then says the command and the students all do the action. After repeating a few times it is possible to extend this by asking the students to repeat the word as they do the action.

When they feel confident with the word or phrase you can then ask the students to direct each other or the whole class. It is more effective if the students are standing in a circle around the teacher and you can even encourage them to walk around as they do the action.

TPR can be used to teach and practise many things. It is a lot of fun, students enjoy it and it can be a real stirrer in the class. It lifts the pace and the mood. It is very memorable. It really helps students to remember phrases or words.

It is good for kinaesthetic learners who need to be active in the class. It can be used in large or small classes. It doesn't really matter how many students you have as long as you are prepared to take the lead, the students will follow.

It works well with mixed-ability classes. The physical actions get across the meaning effectively so that all the students are able to understand and use the target language. It doesn't require a lot of preparation or materials. As long as you are clear what you want to practise a rehearsal beforehand can helpit won't take a lot of time to get ready.

The total physical response approach to second language learning

It is very effective with teenagers and young learners. It involves both left- and right-brained learning. A few useful variations When I use TPR, first I get the students to do the actions and then I do them and drill the students chorally and individually to give them an opportunity to practise making the sounds.

They are then ready to give commands to each other. A game I like to play is to organize the students into a circle around me, I say the word and the last person to do the action is out.Comments Off on Second and Foreign Language Teaching Methods; Free. Total Physical Response Approach.

The Natural Approach. COGNITIVE: Based on theories of learning applied specifically to second language learning. Focus is on the learning strategies .

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00 -The Total Physical Response Method for Second Language Learning 3C by James J. Asher Prepared under Contract NONR (00) (NR-l ) for Office of Naval Research Reproduction in whole or part is permitted for any. TPR stands for Total Physical Response and was created by Dr. James J Asher.

It is based upon the way that children learn their mother tongue. Parents have 'language-body conversations' with their children, the parent instructs and the child physically responds to this. The Total Physical Response Approach to Second Language Learning Phonological Asymmetry in Second-Language Learning and Performance, Language Learning, , 38, 4, Wiley Online Library; 9 Ludo Beheydt, The semantization of vocabulary in foreign language learning, System, , 15, 1, 55CrossRef;.

The Total Physical Response Approach to Second Language Learning Phonological Asymmetry in Second-Language Learning and Performance, Language Learning, , 38, 4, Wiley Online Library; 9 Ludo Beheydt, The semantization of vocabulary in foreign language learning, System, , 15, . tions about child language acquisition have influenced his approach to second language learning.

My col- league, Kathleen Graves, will present Total Physical Response.

Total Physical Response